Reviews, photos, and media

MJH_2792 Matt Bowdren 8x10.jpg
Matt Bowdren’s Hamlet was haunting and haunted. He seems mad one moment, simply cunning the next. He is consumed with revenge but has tender moments. His sorrow and his passion are palpable...you get the sense that while Hamlet hears his father’s ghost when no one else can, speaks in riddles that seem to underscore his madness, and is wildly mercurial, he is crazy like a fox. Bowdren kept us glued to his actions and words, anxious to see where he would go to — and he would always go someplace interesting.
— Arizona Daily Star
The key, of course, for making a production of this play work is an excellent Hamlet, and Rogue has given us one. Matt Bowdren captures Hamlet’s complicated personality, his intelligence and his wit with credibility and vulnerability, giving us an artfully compelling and complex character.
— Tucson Weekly
Here is what we loved. Matt Bowdren brought all of Iago’s awful qualities to devastating life. He made him charming, destructive, jealous, cruel. He was hard to turn away from
— -Arizona Daily Star
“Metamorphosis,” the most familiar and theatrically complicated of the two, features a brilliant performance by Matt Bowdren as the unfortunate Gregor Samsa
— Tucson Stage
“The character’s passion for forestry, his exhaustion with caring for patients, and his constant introspection, wrap around Bowdren like a rich cloak. Because of him, we know Astrov, we ache for him, laugh at him.”
— Arizona Daily Star
And Matt Bowdren was sublime as Adolphus, Barbara’s fiancé. He is a bit of a hypocrite - he joined the Salvation Army because he wanted to win Barbara’s heart, not save souls - and Bowdren gives him a charm and depth that brings him into sharp focus.
— Arizona Daily Star
Bowdren’s Robert, an erudite book publisher who hates being betrayed, but not enough to deny indulging in some betrayals of his own, was contained and very British, but all the while radiating a vibe that violence was just under the surface.
— Arizona Daily Star
Matt Bowdren also juggles two roles as Superfrog...Bowdren continues his mastery of not-quite-human characterization, having recently played the man turning into a cockroach lead in Rogue’s production of Kafka’s existential “Metamorphosis.” His Frog is courteous, courageous, yet still alien, creating a sort of Kabuki of the Absurd.
— Tucson Sentinel
Matt Bowdren and John Shartzer play Benjamin and David, two friends whose relationship spans the transition from teen years to adulthood. The two actors not only perform with great nuance and integrity; they give off an air of boundless exuberance, as if the whole production were something they spontaneously put together in their garage.
— Tucson Weekly
Uncle Vanya - Astrov

Uncle Vanya - Astrov

The Arizona Daily Star is taking a look at some of our favorite actors. Some are retired from the stage, others, like Matt Bowdren, still create vivid life on the boards. Here, Bowdren recreates a scene from "Hamlet," a role he played with great success in the 2015-16 season at The Rogue Theatre.

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